History

The Elkridge Furnace Inn holds a unique niche in Maryland history. Nestled on the Patapsco River, the Inn was first established as a tavern in 1744. An iron smelting furnace was added around 1750.

The complex itself comprises approximately 16 acres in the eastern corner of Howard County. It is graced by beautiful Linden, Holly, and Magnolia trees. The dramatic height of the main structure offers vistas of the Patapsco River from the second and third floors. A feeling of peacefulness exudes from the spacious patio and tent as well as the river overlook. The entrance to the main house features fine transitional Federal/Greek Revival detailing and consists of double leaf doors with five panes each flanked by narrow sidelights within a broad architrave.

In 1810, the Inn was purchased by James and Andrew Ellicott. They modernized the iron smelting furnace and constructed an elegant home for their family, attached to the existing tavern. The Inn complex as it stands today is comprised of the owner’s house, company store, and tavern.

The internal architecture also provides a glimpse of Maryland history. The woodwork, mantelpieces, and stairway showcase the craftsmanship of the 18th and 19th centuries. The stairway is graced with tiger maple spindles and walnut cap rails. The floors are the originals and are constructed with longleaf pine, a very slow growing pine which gives the character of hardwood. Dogwood motifs in the moldings can be viewed throughout the house and reflect a popular post colonial style seen also in the U.S. Capital. The interior rooms have been lovingly restored from colonial days, each by an individual designer, thereby giving The Elkridge Furnace Inn both a uniqueness and richness to the main structure.

Today, The Elkridge Furnace Inn houses an elegant restaurant, as well as a gourmet catering company specializing in weddings, corporate events, and celebrations.

Before Reconstruction(approx. 1989)

After Reconstruction